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Category Archive for 'Mrs. Darcy and the Blue-Eyed Stranger'

From her realistic characters to her unforeseeable endings,  Lee Smith is a master at everything intriguing. The very first paragraph is full of interesting information about the story, and tactics by the writer. The story is very conversational which I especially appreciate considering its written in third person. I also like how she tells us from the […]

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This was not the story I expected it to be, but so much more. I was not so much surprised at the setting- a nursing/retirement home- as I was with the fantastic character of Alice Scully. Her attitude was on point. I was taken aback at the point in which Martha Louise dictated that the […]

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What first really struck me in “Fried Chicken,” was the way Mrs. Pegram accepts they way she is shunned. “Who could blame [Mrs. Calhoun] for firing the murderer’s mother, for not wanting the murderer’s mother to be the one who knew where she hid her Xanax in the false bottom of her jewlery box, who […]

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I know I’ve said this so many times this year, but this is my new favorite story, especially since it took me a long time to warm up to Lee Smith.  Through the narration we understand that Karen is lonely, she is trying to find a place in the world that she’s accepted and noticed. […]

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I always have an issue where I have to read Smith’s stories more than once in order to get them. I don’t know what was different about this time, but I automatically focused on the social structures between Mrs. Pegram and everybody else in her community. The first thing I noticed is the point of […]

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Lee Smith points out the importance of place to this story in the story itself when she says “since the trial, Mrs. Pegram has been wishing she lived in a big city, so she could be anonymous” – because Smith chose to set the story in a small town, everyone Mrs. Pegram is acquainted with […]

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I thought that “Between the Lines” was an interesting way of telling this story.  It could have had so many different focuses, and it could have followed the plotline of the stepsister’s death in a moment by moment type frame, but instead it’s almost like the narrator has written us a letter to tell us […]

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This story was really fun to read! I loved the voice of the narrator because I could visualize her character perfectly. It was as though you were sitting at her kitchen table just talking while she gave you a run-down of her entire day and life. She began telling us about her column in the […]

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Mrs. Darcy and the Blue-Eyed Stranger is very different in comparison to the other two books we have been reading in class. While from the outside, it may seem to be less deep, it is absolutely more realistic, and honest. Lee Smith writes in a way that makes it easy for anyone to really relate to her […]

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Folk Art

Folk Art confused and entranced me at the same time. You are being talked to the entire time by a character who keeps answering your questions and telling you stories about her family. The story really is defined by Lily’s family members instead of herself. She even expresses her family through her art. The place […]

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Folk Art

My first thought as I read the opening paragraph of Folk Art was that I would be annoyed with this narrator’s language for the entirety of its eleven pages. Though, I instead became entranced in Lily’s stories, and grew quite fond of her by at least the third page. Very few explicit images are created […]

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The two stories we read for today were very different from the other things we have read this semester.  For starters, they were quite short.  They were written with a different sort of style than the others as well. Return might be my favorite story we have read this semester.  I know, it shocks me […]

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Folk Art

The title is clever – Lily’s statues are folk art because they are colloquial, but also because they are representations of people, who we sometimes refer to as “folks”. The conversation format of the story brings the reader directly into the story, but therefore requires that he be more than generally characterized (the addressee of […]

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This story seems to investigate forces outside the realm of logic that affect people, like the Fata Morgana that “evoke[s] in the viewer a profound sense of longing.” Harold’s life is full of incidences completely grounded in logic, but he encounters some things that are completely inexplicable. Harold grew up normally and boringly. He was […]

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There are a lot of endearing qualities in Lee Smith’s “Toastmaster.” The concept of place is prevalent throughout the story, and we are very aware of the setting.  We are constantly reminded that there is something special about Jeffery- the use of “(word)” to denote a vocabulary word he has used experimentally, keeps us in […]

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The whole underlying theme of this story is the importance of place and how it changes your upbringing.  The character associates certain places with certain kinds of people, and while we see that to a certain degree these stereotypes hold true, Jake seems to break all of these rules.  He’s a northerner so this coupled […]

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In this story, I noticed that Nova never says that she loves Jake. Actually, I don’t think she ever mentions feeling an emotion towards him except maybe a kind of implied pity when she says that he’s too sensitive for this world. She doesn’t seem upset when she describes her miscarriage or how Jake’s mother […]

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A delightful “coming of age” story about the precious boy, Jeffrey (albeit only 11 years old.) A barrage of details, both of place and character, pull the reader along. Among the details are lyrical passages: “the sun hangs like a Day-Glo red yo-yo on a string above the horizon and “it looks like a flaming […]

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Big Girl

When I started off reading this story, my first thought was the movie, Fried Green Tomatoes. The narrator in the story clearly has a weight problem and has had it all of her life. She puts a clear description of how it has effected her over the years, which personally, I have seen people go through […]

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Big Girl

Reading just the beginning of Lee Smith’s “Big Girl” elicited from me a number of different emotions. First, I was amused that I would read a story that I could relate to, for I am myself a big girl. Yet, second, I was appalled that this narrator, this voice was insulting the women of her […]

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