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Category Archive for 'Death Is Not an Option'

None of the Above

This story had so many characteristics of a Rivecca story.  She has lots of similar themes throughout the collection, like school, abuse, and the most prominent, confusion.  Each story has a different level of confusion that the narrator is dealing with, a sort of A vs. B type of dichotomy that they are trying to […]

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None of the Above

I have always enjoyed Rivecca’s stories. This one, however, has to be my favorite. Even though it was longer than some we have read, it didn’t drag out. I never once got tired of reading it, nor did my attention stray from the story. I felt like the narrator was easy to relate too because […]

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Alma’s character is a do-gooder. Her name, meaning “soul, nourishing” even identifies her as such. Her relationships are earnest and honest and true, but she is still missing something. Her husband Kurt had a past she did not know about until his interjection in this story. We don’t recognize Kurt as an important character until […]

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none of the above

The first and last sentences of the first paragraph – “When she first began teaching, Alma promised herself that she would never wear a sweater with an apple on it… In two years of teaching third grade, the apple veto was the only vow she managed to keep” – do a good job of setting […]

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After reading the entirety of Rivecca’s story, I returned to its beginning to recall just how the escapade began. There is a lot of change that happens within this story, without a whole lot of physical changing and movement involved. The change is truly denoted in the way that the main character, Isabel, thinks of […]

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My feelings towards this story are incredibly similar to my feelings on “Consummation”. I feel like it has a lot of conflict, drama, and interesting language going on, but I dont’ quite understand why. The length of the story obviously gives it more of an opportunity to divulge information, yet I don’t think it truly […]

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Consummation

“Consummation,” along with the lot of Rivecca’s short stories, reminds me of just how envious I am not only of her ability to create quite intelligent conflict throughout her stories, but also of her knack for crafting eloquent, twisted uses of language and syntactical flair. Making the narrator seem as if her intention was to […]

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Consummation

I really enjoyed this story. The narrator is obviously conflicted about her relationship with her father because she loves him (how could she not – they are so much alike) but he never paid her much attention except to reprimand her. He was always with his toads and didn’t understand how to give the kind […]

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There are a lot of interesting things happening in Rivecca’s stories. I have a hard time differentiating them from one another, but she writes in a way that informs the reader unlike nearly any other stories I’ve ever read. This story is particularly interesting as it immediately introduces the story in second person, however, slowly […]

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What I found interesting about Rivecca’s portrayal of this young woman, was the way that place was used as a personal identity. We dont really get a look at what the hotline office of cubicles looks like, or really a whole lot about what other people look like except for a few initial descriptive details. […]

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The biggest thing that I noticed in this story is how it is written. It is written in the second person using “you” for the character. The character has no name and no description of any sort. At first I didn’t notice it, but as I kept reading I kept searching for a name before […]

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If you look at the title of this story by itself, “it sounds like you’re feeling”, as opposed to “it sounds like you’re feeling [insert adjective here]”, it seems to identify any and all human emotions as the problem. Since this is one of the comments that the helpline interns are taught to say to […]

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I love Rivecca.  If I ever get the chance to meet her I might stutter and pass out like a fool.  Her ability to clearly articulate exactly what the character is feeling without ever explicitly saying what is going on in her head is just brilliant.  We can feel that the narrator has some insight […]

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Yours Will Do Nicely

The complexity of the conflicts and the characters of “Yours Will Do Nicely” makes me extremely jealous. I wish my name could be stamped upon this story, and I could invoke some of the reactions Rivecca’s writing pulled from me as I read. I found myself unapologetically embarrassed sitting on my bed erupting into fits […]

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Yours Will Do Nicely

The first thing I noticed about this story, I didn’t like. The first paragraph reminded me of the way I wrote early on in my college career; the characteristic drop into a story without much of an entrance,  the summary of what was happening in a common way, then the single long sentence filled with […]

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Yours Will Do Nicely

What I noticed most about this story is that everything that happened seemed mundane. The stream of consciousness style made it possible for Rivecca to use these meaningless events to build a character who was, apparently, trying to create herself. I got the sense that the narrator was unsure of her identity, which was emphasized […]

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Yours Will Do Nicely

The characters are alive and they have taken over. They have told us volumes about themselves simply through what they say. It could be about something that has little to no importance to the story and it would not only tell us about their character, but about how they have been living. It could be […]

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Yours Will Do Nicely

I love the voice that each character has had in both this story and in Death is Not an Option.  They have both been different, but we always seem to be following their train of thought rather than having them narrate a story to us.  It makes them feel more real and without them having […]

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Death Is Not an Option

When I read this story I was more focused on the place Emma is in her life. The author gave details about her transitioning from high school to college. She wants so badly to escape her Catholic high school for a mostly Jewish college. The author makes it clear that she wants to leave but […]

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Death Is Not an Option

The first time I really noticed place in this story was when Emma described the woods as “blue-green undergrowth riddled with Lyme-disease-carrying ticks.“ Clearly, Rivecca placed Emma in a physical environment that she doesn’t belong in and that, as we learn, mirrors the psychological environment created by Emma’s peers. Emma hates her school, her town, and most […]

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