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Monthly Archive for October, 2011

Falling Star

This story had a great narrative speaker. He really made the story easier to imagine. Small town kids from the south, high school education, married young, then started to go different ways. We see this type of thing in a lot of movies and other stories, but this one was very original. Through out the […]

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Lee Smith points out the importance of place to this story in the story itself when she says “since the trial, Mrs. Pegram has been wishing she lived in a big city, so she could be anonymous” – because Smith chose to set the story in a small town, everyone Mrs. Pegram is acquainted with […]

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Falling Star

Because this story is, on one level, about education, the accents the characters speak with are important. Throughout the story, Bobby clearly has a thick, uneducated Southern drawl. At the beginning, when Bobby remembers when Lynn decided to go to college, he recalls her saying “just because you’ve never made anything of yourself don’t mean […]

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Consummation

I really enjoyed this story. The narrator is obviously conflicted about her relationship with her father because she loves him (how could she not – they are so much alike) but he never paid her much attention except to reprimand her. He was always with his toads and didn’t understand how to give the kind […]

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Consummation

This story by Rivecca was both confusing and wonderful for me. At first I thought the narrator was talking or writing to the Doctor that saved her father’ life, but I don’t think that is the case. I enjoyed the story as a whole, but it took me several tries to really understand what was […]

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I thought that “Between the Lines” was an interesting way of telling this story.  It could have had so many different focuses, and it could have followed the plotline of the stepsister’s death in a moment by moment type frame, but instead it’s almost like the narrator has written us a letter to tell us […]

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This story was really fun to read! I loved the voice of the narrator because I could visualize her character perfectly. It was as though you were sitting at her kitchen table just talking while she gave you a run-down of her entire day and life. She began telling us about her column in the […]

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Mrs. Darcy and the Blue-Eyed Stranger is very different in comparison to the other two books we have been reading in class. While from the outside, it may seem to be less deep, it is absolutely more realistic, and honest. Lee Smith writes in a way that makes it easy for anyone to really relate to her […]

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There are a lot of interesting things happening in Rivecca’s stories. I have a hard time differentiating them from one another, but she writes in a way that informs the reader unlike nearly any other stories I’ve ever read. This story is particularly interesting as it immediately introduces the story in second person, however, slowly […]

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Into the Gorge

The setting was at the forefront of this story and had a clear purpose in the plot.  Jesse’s sense of family is found in the woods, and by the ginseng patch near his home.  The plot line that followed the history of his great-aunt and the underlying tension with Jesse’s own age both develop through […]

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Into The Gorge

This story is told from Jesse’s point of view. He is alone where he has grown up his whole life and he experiences the changes around him from when he was younger. He’s watching as a new housing development is being created. Jesse is struggling with what he knows now and thinking about his Great-Aunt […]

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Into the Gorge

This story reminded me of Return. There was a story that happened in the past and the story that was happening in the present to the same person. Those two stories intertwine to create a more powerful story. Only this time, the focus on the two stories were on slightly different people. The past-story was […]

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Folk Art

Folk Art confused and entranced me at the same time. You are being talked to the entire time by a character who keeps answering your questions and telling you stories about her family. The story really is defined by Lily’s family members instead of herself. She even expresses her family through her art. The place […]

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Return

This story is one of my favorites that we’ve read this semester. I enjoyed Rash weaving two different places into a story so well. It felt very natural and real when Rash would switch back and forth from the past to present. The story evoked a lot of emotion in just a few short pages. My […]

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Folk Art

My first thought as I read the opening paragraph of Folk Art was that I would be annoyed with this narrator’s language for the entirety of its eleven pages. Though, I instead became entranced in Lily’s stories, and grew quite fond of her by at least the third page. Very few explicit images are created […]

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The two stories we read for today were very different from the other things we have read this semester.  For starters, they were quite short.  They were written with a different sort of style than the others as well. Return might be my favorite story we have read this semester.  I know, it shocks me […]

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Folk Art

The title is clever – Lily’s statues are folk art because they are colloquial, but also because they are representations of people, who we sometimes refer to as “folks”. The conversation format of the story brings the reader directly into the story, but therefore requires that he be more than generally characterized (the addressee of […]

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Return

I really enjoyed this story! The images presented through out the entire thing were believable and full of emotion. The entire time the narrator was telling the story about the young soldier, I could see, and sometimes feel, the emotions in the words. Even though we see two different places in the story, the main […]

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This story seems to investigate forces outside the realm of logic that affect people, like the Fata Morgana that “evoke[s] in the viewer a profound sense of longing.” Harold’s life is full of incidences completely grounded in logic, but he encounters some things that are completely inexplicable. Harold grew up normally and boringly. He was […]

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There is a widowed woman, alone on a farm too big for her to manage by herself. There are fires being set all over the county during a drought, and there is a man, Carl, who is surely the culprit. However, because Carl marries the widow, Marcie, and she needs the affection and attention that […]

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